Electrical

The all new wiring in 2014 was installed in a couple of weeks. Brian created an electrical box consisting of circuit breakers, postive and negative busses, terminal strips, inverter, and solar charge controller.

We have now moved the electrical panel to the new navigation station, where the old ice box was!

Interior Paint

We painted interlux epoxy primekote on the interior cabin. We like the matte finish and high build easy application. Its also a hard durable finish that works inside (less vulnerable to sunlight), so we avoid the high-gloss, expensive, difficult to apply top coat perfection that we use outside.

We’ll be updating with more paint in the future, and this is a great base for almost anything we choose.

Head – Chart Room

The head was initially converted to a chart room in 2013. All the thru hulls were covered, a composting toilet was installed, and then moved to the V-berth.

We have now re-installed the head in this area, and moved the charting/navigation area to the location of the old icebox.

Jordan Series Drogue

For storm management we built a Jordan series drogue from a Sailrite kit. It consists of 107 cones and is deployed from the chainplates we fabricated and installed on the stern. The series drogue keeps the stern oriented to the weather.

Nesting Dinghy – Junior

Junior was born in 2013. He was built in Beaufort, North Carolina according to plans by Graham Byrnes.

After 2 years of sailing, Junior was ready for some TLC. His makeover was our first project upon return to the states in spring of 2015.

 

Check out this short video of Brian taking Junior apart in the water: Video: Nesting Dinghy, Quick Disassembly.

Exterior Paint

Our new spring 2014 deck paint was interlux perfection, and kiwi grip for non-skid. After our 2015 exterior construction projects, we’ll be painting again. We like the old saying…If it doesn’t move paint it, if it does move, give it a paintbrush.

Tiller Conversion

A previous owner of Dawn Treader had converted its tiller to  rack and pinion wheel steering (bronze components and housing made this a heavy option). Simplicity, performance with wind vane, and weight reduction led us to change back to tiller. During the conversion, rotten deck core was replaced, vent cowls were sealed, a laminated tiller and new hardware (stainless steel cleats, main sheet wench, and main sheet blocks) were added.