Blog

Bucket sink galley

The bucket sink is versatile and moveable. In Dawn Treader, the first location was below the companionway.

After altering our companionway and building a new water tank, we got to work on the galley. We created 3 storage sections (where there was one) with watertight bulkheads.

Our simple galley design has made its everyday use clean, easy, and fun.

Integral Water Tank Part 2

200 hours later, we finished the water tank! Parts 1 (Building an Integral Water Tank) and 2 combined for a rewarding job; now we have double the water capacity (65 gallons), more storage, and an easy to clean cabin sole.

After finishing the brew coat (a food grade epoxy coating), we prepared to epoxy the forward sole section and the main cabin sole/tank top into position. We applied epoxy to the tops of the flange from the old cabin sole, and to the new floors and baffles in the water tank.

We finished the project by filling and painting the border of our new sole. Our water system works great! Check out our galley post to see our bucket sink, foot pump, and water filter.

Watertight Companionway

Traditional sliding companionway designs seem to be the standard, few other options are available. However, we were not satisfied with Dawn Treader’s original design. While researching watertight designs and oceangoing rowboats, we found interesting hatch options that looked to be compatible. We chose the Lewmar Ocean 70 hatch for its large entryway, strength, and watertightness.

A few things changed simultaneously with the new companionway; look for new posts coming soon! Our cockpit footwell volume was reduced. Cabin ventilation was enhanced with the addition of a Lewmar Ocean 30 below the nesting dinghy. Inside the cabin, we now have more space! Our galley area has more elbow room, the new navigation station is in progress, and the cabin design is more open. The cabin sole also has 2 more usable feet of space (we are installing new sole as a result of the water tank project), and now there is ample room for a yoga mat!

We are happy with the companionway redesign! Exit and entry are easier than before, and we are excited to test our watertight hatch at sea! With this big project done, we are one large step closer to sailing.

Repairing Compression Post Base

As we went further into project rabbit hole with the water tank, we found our compression post to be corroded. Dawn Treader’s mast is well supported by a two inch bulkhead, the compression post is fiberglassed to this bulkhead. This made us question the importance of the post, but we decided to repair it regardless. At this point, why not?

Building an Integral Water Tank

Our original project plans did not address changing our water tank. But, upon removing the engine, we gained better access and visibility to the water tank area, this revealed the need for further investigation…

Our work continued, and we ended up removing everything from the bilge: water tank, resin blocks, foam (so much foam). We discovered lots of usable storage after removing oily residue, cleaning, and drying out the bilge.

Removing the water tank revealed the need for reinforcing the compression post, read more in our related post (Repairing Compression Post Base).

Next, we need to construct a new tank! Our new tank will have an expanded footprint that extends well forward of the previous tank. Also, a new integral tank is a good choice for maximizing our water storage capacity. We hope to double the capacity of the previous tank (from 30 gallons).

This unexpected project has lots of benefits! We will be able to carry lots more water for long voyages, our hull has been reinforced with 6 new floors and a heavy fiberglass layup, and we now know Dawn Treader is clean from top to bottom! No more hidden treasures!

In part two we complete the tank with paint, install the tank top/sole, add plumbing and inspection ports.

Engine Removal – New Outboard

We decided to remove out Yanmar 3GM30F and its related systems in favor of a 6 horsepower Tohatsu Sailpro Outboard Engine. We haven’t had the need for all the power of the 27 horsepower diesel. We now have more valuable space and hopefully less maintenance! By removing the inboard engine we are now able to divide the aft third of the boat into watertight compartments. We’ll update more about that project later!

Our cockpit underwent construction. A new sol was put in (look for that post soon). We built a bracket for our new outboard mount out of aluminum, and we can’t wait to test it out!

Forward Hatch

In pursuit of our watertight cabin goal, we decided to replace the original forward hatch with a Lewmar Ocean 60 Watertight Hatch. We built a mahogany combing to mount the hatch on a flush surface, and to avoid splash when the hatch is in its vented position. At first this hatch was difficult to close. So difficult we thought it faulty. However, with strength and weight focused on the handles at their attachment points, we can now close it with increasing ease (thank you James).