Repairing Compression Post Base

As we went further into project rabbit hole with the water tank, we found our compression post to be corroded. Dawn Treader’s mast is well supported by a two inch bulkhead, the compression post is fiberglassed to this bulkhead. This made us question the importance of the post, but we decided to repair it regardless. At this point, why not?

Building an Integral Water Tank

Our original project plans did not address changing our water tank. But, upon removing the engine, we gained better access and visibility to the water tank area, this revealed the need for further investigation…

Our work continued, and we ended up removing everything from the bilge: water tank, resin blocks, foam (so much foam). We discovered lots of usable storage after removing oily residue, cleaning, and drying out the bilge.

Removing the water tank revealed the need for reinforcing the compression post, read more in our related post (Repairing Compression Post Base).

Next, we need to construct a new tank! Our new tank will have an expanded footprint that extends well forward of the previous tank. Also, a new integral tank is a good choice for maximizing our water storage capacity. We hope to double the capacity of the previous tank (from 30 gallons).

This unexpected project has lots of benefits! We will be able to carry lots more water for long voyages, our hull has been reinforced with 6 new floors and a heavy fiberglass layup, and we now know Dawn Treader is clean from top to bottom! No more hidden treasures!

In part two we complete the tank with paint, install the tank top/sole, add plumbing and inspection ports.

V-Berth

The original V-Berth left something to be desired: storage, comfort, style, etc. Some of the original cabinetry had been cut away to accommodate an obsolete holding tank, and the volume of available space was largely inaccessible with the previous compartment design. V-berth reconstruction was also a great opportunity to add structure and strengthen the forward third of the Dawn Treader. Its watertight integrity has been enhanced with new watertight compartments. The V-berth platform was also raised 8 inches above the waterline.

We are super excited to set up our sewing work area in the coming weeks! We’ve got foam, fabric, and a Sailrite Ultrafeed LSZ-1! Let the sewing lessons begin! We’ll see how things turn out…

Ventilation

Ventilation became a high priority after sailing in rougher weather to the Azores. The cabin was stale and claustrophobic! We now have three air-only ventilators (watertight even in a capsize). Two vent cowls were added for the main cabin, and one low profile vent with electric fan was installed for the head.

We also added a new hatch under our nesting dinghy. Because of its protected position, this Lewmar Ocean 30 stays open in most conditions (when the dinghy is stowed). In combination, the new air-only ventilators, small protected hatch, forward hatch, and companionway complement 4 original port holes and give Dawn Treader many ventilation options.

 

Electrical

The all new wiring in 2014 was installed in a couple of weeks. Brian created an electrical box consisting of circuit breakers, postive and negative busses, terminal strips, inverter, and solar charge controller.

We have now moved the electrical panel to the new navigation station, where the old ice box was!

Interior Paint

We painted interlux epoxy primekote on the interior cabin. We like the matte finish and high build easy application. Its also a hard durable finish that works inside (less vulnerable to sunlight), so we avoid the high-gloss, expensive, difficult to apply top coat perfection that we use outside.

We’ll be updating with more paint in the future, and this is a great base for almost anything we choose.

Head – Chart Room

The head was initially converted to a chart room in 2013. All the thru hulls were covered, a composting toilet was installed, and then moved to the V-berth.

We have now re-installed the head in this area, and moved the charting/navigation area to the location of the old icebox.